Shock Value

Shock Value

The Nigerian economy, like any other, experiences “shocks”— events or policy decisions that can send a ripple of changes through the system. This column zooms in on these ripples in a range of sectors to explore how and why these shocks matter.

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Political Superwomen (Part 1)

Ebehi Iyoha

Ebehi Iyoha

Ebehi is an avid reader seeking insights in unexpected places. Her research interests include economic development, political economy and trade.

This article is Part I of a series. Read Part II here

President Buhari’s decision to delay ministerial appointments until September has, quite understandably, generated a lot of speculation. Many questions abound. Will the former military head-of-state stuff his cabinet with retired generals? Will he opt for the company of men his own age or give the government a youthful facelift? Are southerners going to be selected in substantial numbers or will this administration be dominated by the north? At this point, it wouldn't hurt to throw another concern into the mix – how prominently will women feature in government over the next four years?

Losing Out in the Legislature

Anyone hoping for women to be victorious in the last general election will have been sorely disappointed. The only woman to run for president, Oluremi Sonaiya got the third lowest votes of the 14 candidates. Meanwhile, hopes for the first elected female governor were ultimately dashed when Aisha Al-Hassan lost by a close margin to her male opponent in Taraba State, and of the 87 women who stood as governorship candidates or running mates in the 29 states where elections were held, only four emerged as deputy-governors.  

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